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company" -- 50 years after the historic march on washington, we go back to the scene with john lewis, who spoke that day half a century ago. where you're standing now, looking out there. that's all the crowd. >> it was good to be in the presence of lincoln. and i feel honored to have an opportunity to come here almost 50 years later. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and
georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about
it in 50 years. the 1963 march on washington. >> now back to roger mudd. >> here at the lincoln memorial, the sight that is almost something no washingtonian has beheld. >> news reports from the march along with coverage of the civil rights movement helped change minds about the protesters and the fight to end segregation. we'll talk with the reporters who were there, including dan rather, who reported for cbs news and paul delaney, a founding member of the national association of black journalists. >>> plus "the new york times" says espn dropped its partnership with public tv's "front line" when the nfl objected to a documentary about head injuries. does this show the influence sports leagues have over sports journali journalism's biggest player? >>> and are you one of the movie goers that made this the top-grossing film last weekend? >> there he is. what's your name sdm. >> cecil gaines. >> i'm carter wilson, head butler. >> did you know the story of "the butler" began with one reporter's quest for the ultimate white house insider? we'll talk with the "washington post"'s wil haygood ab
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
washington. helping to kick off our special coverage, chris matthews, host of msnbc "hardball" is live in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial and where all of today's event will take place. chris, good morning. let's set the scene for everybody. as we understand the program for today, we have three presidents, a host and current and former future civil rights and leaders and politicians taking the stage. truly a diverse program but we all look back 50 years ago to those vivid images that still inspire today. >> thomas, this is going to be a hot day. it's not that hot. it's sweltering today but not as bad as it could get in washington. it's drizzling and may clear up. i expect there is heated rhetoric today. this country is divideded right now, heavily and sharply divided between the one reject an african-american president and rejected him from the day he was elected and the day they heard he might be elected. the other half of the country almost pouting with this illusion right now. gee whiz. why isn't this greater? pef an african-american president and things not happen
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
be the secretary of dhs is the most thankless job in washington. that is not true. no doubt, it is a very big and comics job. it is literally a 24/7 job, that as my successor will soon learn, it is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. what you do hear matters to the lives of people all across our great nation him and your decisions affect them in direct and tangible ways. you make sure their families are safe from terrorist threats, that their local first responders have equipment and training and funding, and that when disaster strikes people who have lost everything are given food and shelter and hope. and that thanks for that is not owed any single individual or cabinet secretary, but to that 240,000 dhs employees, many of whom work in tough conditions around the clock to accomplish our shared and noble mission, and that includes some who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. they are the backbone of your nation's homeland security, and over the past 4 1/2 years, it has been my pleasure to serve with them and build a more agile department of homeland security. i thank
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
. ♪ [applause] >> thank you. 50 years ago, they did not take a bus outing to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. [applause] i met a man not long ago, i tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, y
in washington but first this report from jane ferguson. >> reporter: anti-military retestprotests in egypt has cha. they replace the demonstrations. here, around a thousand people gathered around the migathered . >> translator: i'm here to say no with an open chest. i know there are murders from the army and thugs with the police at any moment but i am standing here steadfast with us. >> reporter: the protests are daily now and they are noisy. they are in honor to protest and to avoid the serious crack downs. on tuesday, the anti-coup alliance says it has a new tactic to try to maintain. >> translator: the situation in this is tense what we do in each area and also depends on the curfew. there's demonstrations. every government has its own. some you will find -- the change in protests. >> reporter: the presidential candidate, the country called terrorism. that's the way those supporting the military-led government have been referring to those opposed to them. >> translator: issue needs to be raised. will anyone accept egypt to be a victim of a terrorism. this is the issue, egypt will not accep
memorial in washington, d.c., where we all try to advance the dream. >>> good evening from new york. i'm chris hayes. tonight on "all in," as the struggle for low-wage employees continues, fast food worker strikes demanding higher wages spread across the country. my guess tonight is the former ceo of mcdonald's, who says raising the minimum wage will kill jobs. i disagree, and that's coming up. >>> also tonight, this weekend we commemorate the 50th anniversary on the civil rights march on washington. tonight, a look at a half century of racial progress. how far we have come and how far we have yet to go. >>> but we begin tonight with president obama, who just a few hours ago completed the last of four speeches in two days about something that is increasing the source of high anxiety for middle class families, the cost of higher education. >> over the last three decades, the cost of higher education has gone up 260% at a time when family incomes have gone up about 16%. >> the president may have been slightly understating just how bad it is. while the cost of a private non-profit four-ye
>> rose: welcome to the program. august 28, 2013, marks 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the famous speech by dr. martin luther kino congressman johning with, who with dr. king. progress. back in 1963, charlie, let me tell you, i s that said white waing, colored waiting, those signs are gone. we passed the civil rights bill. we passed the voting right act, the fair housing act. and when people say to me nothing has checked. i say come dalk in my scooz. >> we talk with jonathan rider, isabelle wilkerson, and clarence jones. >> the march was nmy view, the culminn ofio 100 years of frustration and despair. 1963 began with the centennial, the 100th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. and that means that when these people came together, those quarter of a million people came together, they were in some ways representing all the hopes and dreams that had idea yt to be fulfull fulfilled. >> rose: the 50th anniversary of the march on washington next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we be
this country and to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the good saturday afternoon to you, everyone. i am craig melvin coming live from the feet of the lincoln memorial continuing our coverage. we heard speech from civil rights and political leaders ranging from attorney general eric holder of course here and house speaker -- house minority leader nancy pelosi and the families of trayvon martin and of course martin luther king iii scheduled to join us at some point here over the next hour or so, and again right now thousands about to start retracing the steps that marchers took 50 years ago. so has peter alexander who is along the march route and let me start with you. what is the scene like right now? >> so right now we're along the route on independence avenue and you can see the police are clearing the way as they arrive here at the martin luther king memorial. we are joined by so many people who witnessed history as we wait to see those who participated in it, one of those voices is the gentleman i met today named franklin delano, no roosevelt, but williams. you
washington, there is a march -- a reenactment about a mile east of here at the base of the capitol, that's where they will begin retracing the steps that were taken 50 years ago. we have heard from senator angus kaine, joaquin castro from san antonio, texas, and a highlight so far as been the music. two-thirds of the trio peter paul and mary sang blowing in the wind. and un ambassador, major of atlanta, he got up there and belted out some spiritual songs that were popular in the heyday of the civil rights moment. at this moment we're hearing from the widow of med -- med ger evers. and earlier we heard from melanie campbell. she had some very strong words about a topic that is on the forefront of many people's minds here today. let's listen. >> today racism and inequality does not manifest itself in a white sheet, jim crow laws, poll taxes or barking dogs, but the dogs are still biting in other ways. today there are no white sheets, but there are judges in black robes in the u.s. supreme court who struck down section 4 of the voting rights act, opening the flood gates in many states to p
. this is the "full court press" coming to you live on current tv from our studio on capitol hill in washington, d.c. good to see you this morning and good to have you with us and welcome to washington and the summer in washington where it's kind of a ghost town with the congress out of town and the president out of town. he spent the night in los angeles. he will be down at camp pendleton later this afternoon. we will bring you up to date on the news of the day and take your calls at 1-866-55-press. look forward to hearing from you on twitter at bpshow and on facebook at facebook.com/billpressshow. in the news today, of course, everybody still buzzing about the fact that "the washington post" was sold. could "the new york times" be next? that's what people are asking. and around washington, the most common reaction is well, jeff bezos bought it, at least it wasn't rupert murdoch or the koch brothers. good news on the child obesity front. give some credit to first lady michelle obama. pardon me. oh, my god, i don't think i've ever done that on television before but for the first time ever -- not e
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
that was water. the river came in much closer. it is now washington. as you walk that in fact was the nec as you come in from now the south bend and to boston. it was one of dozens to occupy the gigantic boston harbor and the british had the needy. they kept the entrance open so they could get provisions whether they be from england or from canada. this meant that even though they were completely surrounded by land, boston as a british occupied garrison wasn't going to start. in june of 1775 and this was a battle like none other to it like a terrified young spectator event for those not only living in boston, but in towns around all of the roots of boston were filled with people watching as more than 2,000 regulars made their way across the harbor and the charles river to the charlestown peninsula and began the assault that would erupt into the battle of bunker hill. so this was something viewed by anyone here and then there would settle into a stalemate that would then have george washington archive and that would change anything. and then eventually in march 17, 1776, the british would be forc
hosted by the stemson center in washington, d.c. included analysts like stuart bolin, inspector general for iraq reconstruction and his recent report arguing that a the u.s. does not have a well executed plan to implement and oversee the reconstruction efforts. defense department and u.n. officials also participated in the discussion. this is an hour and a half. >> good morning everyone. i am ellen laipson and i'm delighted to welcome you to the stimson center for this muggy of this conversation about war and peace new tools for messy transition. we are gathering at the time that we can see the end of both the iraq and afghanistan engagement, and this event in a way is pivoted around the offer by the special inspector general for the iraqi reconstruction to present some of the findings for the final report so the special inspector general office created in 2004 is now completing its work so it is a moment of reflection and looking back at what are some of the lessons of iraq, but we know that iraq is such an out liar and may be such an exception in the kind of engagement both the united
. are all the storms over. wjz is live with first warning weather coverage. marty is in mount washington with the mobile weather lab. meteorologist chelsea ingram is in the first warning weather center. we'll start with chelsea. >>> hello everyone. we're quiet for now. things have calmed down a bit. take a look at live first warning doppler weather radar. we had a few showers and thunderstorms push over on the eastern shore, some residual from what went on this morning. we have a few spotty showers in the lower eastern shore, honestly not a lot going on. we had so much activity move through earlier today all out ahead of a cold front passing through this afternoon. here it is, we brought you back in time. you can see these strong thunderstorms developing where you see the pink and purple and black, that's where we have indicators of hail and potentially even the location of some potential tornadoes that the national weather service will be serving later today, and we looked at harford county and cecil county. those were the two main spots where we had the strongest weather move through w
is facing condemnation here in the u.s., as well. tahman bradley is joining us from washington with more. good morning, tahman. >> reporter: good morning, diana and gio. the muslim brotherhood is calling for a friday of anger today, stoking fears of more bloodshed. the international community is worried that the crisis in egypt is worsening. cairo is poised to erupt again today. the muslim brotherhood, which supports ousted president mohamed morsi, has called for mass protest marches after friday prayers. the ruling military will be waiting. egypt's interior minister authorized the use of deadly force against demonstrators who target police or state buildings. the country remains in a state of emergency, after wednesday's bloody crackdown on pro-morsi supporters. the government now says more than 600 people were killed. >> you can't kill your own people. and get away with it. >> reporter: egypt's christians are pleading for help. they say a number of churches have come under attacks of people accusing them of siding with the military. one woman says her church was doused in gasoline. >>
details come from nsa leaker edward snowden. he shared them with the "washington post." we have infractions was unauthorized surveillance of u.s. citizens. >> a lot of what happens in the agency, even the nsa is reflection of the culture they see from the top and you have have a president and administration that revels going beyond the box, if you will, that they're limited to to by law and i think that seeped all the way down into the nsa. jon: wendell goler is live in martha's vineyard where president obama is on vacation. any response from the administration, wendell? >> reporter: well, jon, the nsa says these are mistakes and while the number of them may seem large it is really a small percentage of the phone calls and emails the agency tracks. the information was contained in a 2012 audit as allison said, edward snowden leaked to "the washington post." when nsa make as mistake carrying out the foreign intelligence commission they report it earn certainly to federal overseers and aggressively gets to the bottom of it. the audit says the nsa decided not to tell the oversight
in washington. everybody body out. you don't have to go home but you've got to get the heck out of here. there was a mass exodus as the house of representatives officially adjourned for their august recess this afternoon. like teenagers on the last day of school, members of congress just bolted for the exits today once with the final bell rang. bye-bye. see you in a month. washington is now heading off for its summer vacation. their august recess. what do you do when you're heading off for vacation? well, don't you tend to take care of a few last-minute things. maybe run the dishwasher one last time. you take out the trash. you do all of these things in order to put your house in order before you leave. you do that so you're not faced with a big stinky mess when you get back home. that's what people do when they're heading out for vacation. turns out, washington did the same thing. now, contrary to what you may have heard, they actually did get some stuff accomplished before they skipped town today. we have a new u.s. ambassador. a lot of people expected this to be a big hair are confir
in atlanta. she has been in washington for all the events and joins us tonight from washington. good to have you on this program. sense of how you have felt throughout these honoring the event and your father. you always want the person back with you. in that vein it has been exciting, because it speaks to of thenitude contribution he made that we are here looking at and talking about that time that was so and able to andbrate the progress recognize we have so much to do. thoughtsat are your about your mother and your for thist being around celebration? and foremost my father talked about his four little children. there are only three of us left. that void is very much felt. i say all the time martin luther king is different from the martin luther king today, and i to my mother, whose tireless efforts to keep his legacy alive, and perhaps we celebrating,n be because it was 1983, and every five years there was an so iersary remembrance, think about her, because we are here in many respects, and she cannot forget the tremendous contributions, and we cannot forget there is so much work to .o th
. the march on washington teaches us that we are not trapped by the mistakes of history. we are masters of our fate. it also teaches us that the promise of this nation will only be kept when we work together. we will have to reignite the embers of empathy and fellow feeling, the coalition of conscience that found expression in this place 50 years ago. i believe that spirit is there. that force inside each of us. i see it when a mother recognizes her own daughter in the face of a poor black child. i see it when the black youth think of his own grandfather in the dignified steps of an elderly white man. it is there when the nativeborn recognizes that striving spirit, when interracial couple connects the pain of a gay couple and experiences it as their own. that is were courage comes from. when we turn not from each other, or on each other, but towards one another and we find that we do not walk alone. that is were courage comes from. -- where courage comes from. [cheers and applause] with that courage, we can stand together for good jobs and just wages. we can stand together for the right to hea
not a political dispute but more interesting, the ambassador to washington came out with that statement that the egyptian government was trying or at least going to review the u.s. aid and that certainly caught a lot of people here by surprise. in recent days the egyptian government has been trying to assert more of its sovereignty. it's one of the things it's criticized for, over the years it was seen that it was somewhat of a lap dog on the u.s. government's hand because the former regime of hosni mubarak was so closely allied to washington. this government is trying to distance itself from any type of foreign interference particularly those critical of its actions. when it comes to those governments that have been very close or supporting the government's crackdown they have been welcoming them and that's caught some people here by surprise. another point that caught people here off guard was the reference to the fact hat the united states and the taliban have both expressed reservations in terms of what is happening here on the ground and that was a point that the foreign minister a
washington journal for august the third. potential attacks by al qaeda has part of the state department to issue a worldwide alert for travelers. the attacks may occur before the end of august with north africa and the middle east been the focus of that threat. wall street journal reporting that a bill is being proposed that would double the amount of guest worker visas. turning to the economy, the unemployment figure is at 7.4% with 162,000 jobs created in august. that is the economy nationwide. we want to get your take on the economy. is it getting better or worse yet go and how much washington how -- or worse yet go and how much does washington -- influence does washington have. again, for our first 45 minutes on the to get your take economy. you can call us on those lines. if you want to reach out to us on social media, twitter @ cspanwj. on facebook we have about 13 comments. you can always send us an e-mail at journal@c-span.org. here are the figures from the front page of the wall street journal -- it also talks about the unemployment figure, standing at 7.4%. that is
.com/cspan. discussion continues tomorrow morning on "washington journal." we will have a look at the latest on the overnight news of violence in egypt. a guest from the center of american progress and from the cato institute talk about the constitutionality of state nullification issues. grid ands. electric its former building, and a guest from the pew research center in our america by the numbers serious. -- series. tomorrowon journal," and everyday day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. to the whitete house 2016 coverage with senator amy klobuchar, democrat of minnesota. she will receive the beacon award for hillary clinton tomorrow at the annual wingding in clear lake, iowa. live coverage of that event at 7:00 p.m. eastern. season two of "first ladies," influence and image, begins monday, september 9 with a look at the life of edith roosevelt. all this month, encore presentations of season one. each weeknight at 9:00 p.m. eastern, from -- programs of every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, mary todd lincoln. [captioning performed bynational captioning institute] [captions co
.. >> the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. and later, senator tom coburn hears from his constituents during a town hall meeting in oklahoma. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: walt mossberg, has technology plateaued? >> guest: oh, no, absolutely not. absolutely not. technology is always changing and always coming up with -- technology companies are always coming up with something new, and there are new technology companies all the time incubating, a lot of them are in what we call stealth mode. we don't even know who they are. certain technologies plateau and things move on, but in general, no. not at all. >> host: i guess i ask that because the last couple years we've had the explosion of smartphones, we've had tablets come online. what's out there? >> guest: well, first of all, there are vast numbers of people especially in the less developed cups, but even in the developed countries who don't own a smartphone and, certainly, there are vast thurms that don't own -- numbers th
bought and sold in washington. i'm sorry, what are you saying? >> ok. >> the democracy is bought and sold in washington. this is not the idea of democracy that brought me to the united states. i came from another country where there was a dictatorship, i was expecting ideal democracy where one person and one vote was -- host: where are you from originally? >> cameroon. >> my daughter was snatched from the street not because she was doing anything wrong simply because she stopped ask directions from a cop that doesn't understand french and she doesn't understand english, and because of that she has been in a mental substitution for eight years. i've done my best, everything i could to get out and she can't get out. from france where she came from and now she can't go back to france. the immigration will not deport her to anywhere. so i don't know what else anybody can do in this country to have the right justice, t take you can't jus anybody from the streets or your house. host: angie from scombrooksville, florida. -- from jacksonville, florida. good morning, you're from our independent l
. .. with the president to announce plans for the march on washington. in support of the civil rights act. >> june 12th, 1963 as everest was returning home for the naacp meeting member byron shot him in his driveway as he was getting out of his car. evers was killed instantly. ♪ ♪ >> randolph and fellow americans , the national urban league is honored to be a participant in this historic occasion. our presence here reflects not only the civil rights communities increasing the awareness of the urban league, but most important it says and i hope what and clear that while intelligence, maturity and strategy dictates a civil rights agency we use different methods and we are all united as never before on the goal of first class citizenship. >> to present to you the moral leader of the nation. i have the pleasure to present to you dr. martin luther king. [applause] i am happy to join with you today what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. [applause] five years ago, a great american in the shadow we stand today signed the emancipation proclamatio
and smoke it, too. the feds will now let states decide on pot. >> i love seattle, washington, rocks. >> colorado, washington. >> they call it wake and bake. some wake up every morning. ♪ light up. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." >>> more on the doj pot decision a little later. good morning to you, i'm carol costello. first up, syria. president obama reaches out and u.s. allies back away. this morning an international coalition to support military strikes on syria is crumbling. the most stinging rejection from washington's closest ally. take a look at the cover of "new york daily news" the british aren't coming. british lawmakers voted against taking any part of any military action. other allies like germany and france are also gun shy, still haunted by the iraq war. those concerns echo loudly in congress where more than 160 lawmakers, both republicans and democrats, are demanding at least a full debate before any strikes are launched. last night, president obama and top members of his cabinet spent 90 minutes trying to rally support among skeptical lawmakers. >> the congress, l
of progress in the investigation. elizabeth brprann is live in washington with more. >> as lawmakers continue to seek answers about what happened and why the night of september 11th in benghazi. we are getting a new indication of how interested the administration is. >> as time has passed and more facts have become known, whether it's about the benghazi and talking points or conduct with the irs attempts to turn this into a scandal have failed. >> the white house says they consider the attacks to be among one of the phony scandals. he was referring to claims republican law americas that the administration misled the public about the nature of the attack by stressing the connection to an anti islam film. some law americas aren't dealing very lightly. they continue to push for more answers. behind closed doors they met with bristol who was leading an elite task force when the terrorists attacked the benghazi consulate. he spoke in a classified briefing yesterday. sources tell us he confirmed what other military brass told law americas despite what the white house does claim u.s. officials were
and house members on syrian intelligence tomorrow in washington. officials were expected to lay out plans for military action against the assad regime. the head of the meeting, it is important that lawmakers ask tough questions of the president. for example, both iran and syria will attack israel if the u.s. launches a military attack. if it happens, how will the administration respond? will they help our closest ally in the region? finally, what is the end game if assad's regime is toppled? is there a possibility al qaeda-related elements may, in fact, take charge of the country? president george w. bush was hounded by the press over these questions. if he had to answer, so should barack obama. here in stud quo is fox news channel's own colonel oliver north. his new book out in paperback today. >> it is a must read for barack obama. he needs to read this one. it's about a president who forgets about 9/11. guess what's three weeks away? >> my concern is, first of all, this has been going on for 30 months. 100,000 killed. >> over 100,000 dead. over 250,000 wounded. 2.3 million people in re
for a presidential medal of freedom? share with us this morning on "washington journal to go (202) 585-3880 four republican, (202) 585-3881 for democrats and (202) 585-3882 for independents. you can also e-mail us or send it via twitter, @cspanwj facebook.com/c-span, or journal@c-span.org is our e-mail address. here is an article from the "hill" newspaper. host: andy 16 recipients for the newest batch of presidential medal of freedom honorees, president oakland the, opera daniel, sally ride, bayard loretta lynn, kahneman,niel patricia ward, arturo sandoval, gloria steinem, ernie banks. post"rmer "washington editor receiving the medal of freedom. it says here 91 years old, who remains a vice president at large at the newspaper. respected for his tenure at the editor from 1968 through 1991 during the paper's heyday. some of the other nominees, other winners this year are the late senator daniel anyway of nouye of- i host: 202 is the area code or who would you nominate for the presidential medal of freedom? (202) 585-3880 for republicans, (202) 585-3881 for democrats, and (202) 585-3882 for all oth
and line up at the podium. ~ you will each have two minutes to speak. jeantel washington. keith ward, and carl walter [speaker not understood]. >>> hi, good evening. i have a letter addressed to the board that -- >> i'm sorry, your name? >>> sure, my name is carl walter. i'm an organizer for service employees international, united service workers west, and we represent 40,000 security officers, janitors, airport service workers, and an allied entertainment division across the state of california. i'd like to thank you for allowing me the time to speak to you this evening. and begin by acknowledging the enormous responsibility that all of you share to ensuring the quality of education for the children of san francisco and to have a brighter future for tomorrow. i'm here tonight this evening to talk to you about the contract for security services that went out to bid recently in the district. the district has utilized security services for over 12 years. securitaz is a union company. the union has worked for over a decade in san francisco and across the bay area to improve standards fo
made in washington and agreed by the government here, then that's really why we're here, because washington feels there should be some bombs falling this weekend. now, many atrocities have taken place in the last two years since the conflict began. shirley, those seeking to take military action could wait a few days longer to assure that the facts are straight but it's obvious there's no threats to this journey of the uk that we know that the government seeks military action in order to deter and undermines chemical weapons, that's fine. that it may well see, that's fine, although military action has to be sanctioned by law. but surely, it should wait until the full conclusive proof is available their fight by the >> that has descended the civil war. the recent spill regarding militant objection has been confusing. last friday at united states and the uk governments were pressing for weapons inspectors to be allowed in c. on monday the inspector general's went albeit in difficult circumstances but on monday evening all indications were that the u.s. and uk had made up their minds
. but a lot of people across 43 states in washington, d.c., before the drawing, were caught up in lotto fever. >> got to be in it to win it. >> reporter: look at these long lines. >> if i -- i would give to my mom. >> reporter: from coast-to-coast. >> i spent like $50 every time i get paid. i don't win. somebody help me. >> reporter: helping fuel the frenzy, a recent game change. the price of a powerball ticket doubled from a buck to $2 last year, doubling the amount going into the jackpots. some people won't buy a ticket until the winnings soar past $100 million and more. more than 4 million people won smaller prizes in last night's drawing. nonjackpot winnings total $66.8 million. tahman bradley, abc news, washington. >>> just in case you've been digging around for those tickets, there in jersey or in minnesota. the winning powerball numbers. here they are. 5, 25, 30, 58, 59 and the powerball is 32. >> if you didn't have them, take heart. there's another powerball drawing on saturday night. that jackpot worth a mere $40 million. >>> now to the growing political tension between the u.s. and
the night in the wilderness in northern washington state are safe because of excellent engineering. a temporary road was built in north cascade national park after floodwaters flashed out a permanent one. it forced 65 people stranded in nature. construction on the new road was finished. >>> new this morning, tragedy at a baseball game. a fan at atlanta's turner field fell more than 60 feet to his death during the brave's home game last night. this happened after a lengthy rain delay, nearly 90 minutes. investigators are trying to figure out how he fell. it's believed to be the second fatal fall at the stadium. >>> now, to a pair of legal developments, the effects can be felt coast-to-coast. one involves how drug offenders are dealt with. >> the other addresses the power of police and how they interact with civilians, particularly in new york. tahman bradley has details on both. >> reporter: this morning, two major changes in crime laws with implications for millions. attorney general eric holder has ordered federal prosecutors to stop sweeping up nonviolent drug offenders and sente
anniversary of the march on washington takes place on c-span and will also take place on wednesday with special coverage on this program as well as the president giving a speech. the president's impact on civil- rights to date? guest: that is interesting. my students try to draw a link between martin luther king and president obama. senses a link in the they're both african-american leaders and have had massive followings. they are seen as their opinions having an impact. but they exist in very different times. president obama exists in a time when there. demographicndous changes going on. the role of the u.s. in the world is in a different place. he is president. he is not a civil rights leader. he is the president of the entire country. his constituency is essentially everybody. king's constituency was those committed to civil rights in the issues he worked on. those are important differences. ability ofs, the president obama to be elected twice is a result of the sacrifices and struggles people carried on in the history of the country, not just in the civil rights movement, but
mall commemorating since martin luther king jr.'s 1963 march on washington and his iconic "i have a dream" speech. he told the crowd "the journey is not complete. we can and we must do more." get you now back to "cavuto on business." >>> at least the nasdaq got ahead of naming its latest flub a flash freeze. sounds so much better than flash crash. i don't know if a three-hour shut down counts as a flash or anything. charlie, i don't know. not encouraged. >> this is really bad. the biggest culprit is the securities and exchange commission which three years after the flash crash, when prices imploded in 30 seconds, i can't remember how fast and how far. they've done almost nothing about market structure and we have a market that's convoluted and makes no sense. mostly computers, they break down all the time and we actually have many markets, not just two markets. how do you know the real price of a stock. >> the more you say this, you wrote a book "circle of friends" the more you say this, a smaller and smaller circle. like two people. >> yeah. i will say this, though, you know, the
is adjusting to life in washington with the exception of one thing. >> a break -- >> on "cbs this morning." >> pope benedict tosaid god tol him to retire. i was thinking it's a good thing god's not talking to alex rodriguez. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." norah o'donnell is off. good morning, gayle. >> good morning, charlie. >> we begin with the wildfire outside yosemite park, growing at an alarming rate. 1 it is one of 55 major wildfires burning in the western united states. >> our sacramento station is west of yosemite. you've been covering this region for years. have you ever seen anything like this? >> reporter: i have not. residents around here haven't either. they said it's been since 1987 they've seen a fire even approaching something like this, that this one is burning much more quickly and much stronger as well. about 300 hopes evacuated after governor brown declared a state of emergency in california. the rim fire, burning about a week or so, remains only 1% contained. firefighters worked through the night to battle the flames. in the last 24 hours, the fire nearly quadruple
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